St. Patrick’s Day Single Layer No Sew Braided Edge Fleece Throw

This single layer fleece throw is perfect for cool nights and crisp air conditioned homes. This throw is finished with a hand-woven braided edge. Braided edges are soft unlike the knots of the tied edge so they are more comfortable to lay or lean on. Each style has its place and both looks, look great!

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Supplies:
anti-pill or blizzard fleece

  • 1 yard for a baby, 1.5 yards for a child and 2 yards for an adult (these are standard sizes but you can make any size you wish / 2-3 yards if you’re sharing it on the sofa with another human or a pet!)
  • I prefer anti-pill fleece for throws and blankets because they are softer and do not pill with washing as quickly as the blizzard does.

Tools:
scissors or 45mm or 60mm rotary cutter
cutting mat (only if using a rotary cutter)
quilter’s ruler, 12″ ruler, yardstick, tape measure, or cardboard pattern
Xacto® knife, if desired (I use the #11 blade)

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Lay your fleece out on as flat a surface as possible, I use the dining room floor. Lay it with the right side up. For this project, your fleece should be folded in half with the right sides out.

The wrong side will usually be less vivid in color and less fuzzy but on solids it is even harder to tell. Take the edge that has been cut from the bolt (not the selvage edge) between your two hands and pull your hands gently away from each other. The edge of the fabric should curl. Whichever way it curls towards, is the wrong side. You’ll always want to work with the fleece’s right side up.

Here, I’m using two yards of fleece, so what I have done is folded it in half with the two cut sides from the bolt coming together. (At the top of the picture). By folding the single layer of fabric, it makes it a little easier to work with because it takes up less space and you only have to cut three sides. Don’t accidentally cut the folded side! (I’ve done that before and made a smaller double sided throw for the cats!) The two sides will be the selvaged sides and at the bottom of the picture is the fold.

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Using scissors and a straight edge (or rotary cutter, mat, and ruler) begin trimming the selvage sides off and even up the cut edges from the bolt on the top side. Make sure when trimming the selvage (selvedge) you cut all of it off; it you look closely at it, between the company information and the beginning of your pattern, there are tiny dots, these must be trimmed off as well.

Once the edges are trimmed and even, leave the fleece folded and cut the two corners opposite of your folded edge. You can use a mat, ruler, and pattern cut from cardboard as I have done here. If using the rotary cutter, don’t “overcut”, cut short of the 2″ and finish cutting out your 2″ square with scissors. I usually make a 2″ fringe for a braided single layer throw and a 1½” fringe for a double layer throw. Here we will be using the 2″ fringe. You don’t actually have to cut these squares out; cutting the fringe all the way around will naturally have them drop off, but I like to do it ahead of time.

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At this point, I move my fabric to the table to cut the fringe. If you move it, make sure to keep it folded so all the edges are even. Once again, lay your fabric with the right side up.

We’ll begin to cut the three sides (your fabric is still folded in half). Using a ruler, yardstick or any straightedge, measure in 2″ from the edge. When my fabric is folded in half, I begin at the cut edge and move towards the folded edge. I like to use painter’s tape and tape off the measurement. If using a quilter’s ruler, you’ll be cutting up into the ruler’s edge and can damage it, that’s why I use tape instead. (None of these cuttings need to be exact!)

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Once measured, begin cutting using scissors or a rotary cutter every 1″ wide up to your tape. So you’re fringe will be 1″ wide by 2″ long.

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When you get to your folded edge, take your scissors and cut through the edge of the fold. You have now completed one side. Now fringe the other side and the unfolded side. It doesn’t actually matter in what order you cut the sides, just don’t fringe the folded edge!

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When done, open your fabric up. You’ll now have four fringed sides!

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Next, we’ll be making small slits in each fringe so we can weave one fringe through another for the braided edge. There are two ways of doing this. Using your scissors, fold the fringe about in half and cut a small slit in the folded section. You’ll need sharp scissors for this and you’ll still get a slightly ragged slit but that’s okay. I prefer to use a razor blade to cut my fringe.

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Using the Xacto® knife, I am able to make a smaller hole, much easier and much faster. Do whatever works for you with the tools you have. Begin slitting each fringe, you can do all the sides at one time or work in sections.

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To pull one fringe through the other, you have a few options. the opened up paper clip is popular with some folks:

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You can also use a pair of forceps or tweezers:

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I personally prefer using my fingers. So once again, pick a method that works for you. We’ll begin by choosing a starting side. I usually always pick one of the shorter sides. This is where the single knot for the whole throw will be, so it will be the beginning and end of the braid. Go the the center of that side and grab a fringe. That will be Fringe 1. You may work to the left or to the right. I am going left here. Grab the next fringe (Fringe 2) and poke and then pull it through the slit in Fringe 1. The “W” below refers to the wrong side of the fabric. The right side of the fabric should always be facing up as it is here.

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Next, take Fringe 3 and poke/pull it through Fringe 2. The “W” refers to the wrong side of the fabric and the “R” refers to the right side of the fabric. Continue by taking the next fringe and weaving it through the one before. (If the fabric is pulling, just gently grab the braid and stretch it out a little.)

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You will now see a braid begin to develop. Continue until you get to the end of that side.

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Now, continue right around your corner doing the same thing.

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Your corner will take care of itself.

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Continue all the way around your fabric until you get to the last fringe.

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Cut the last fringe from the edge through its slit to where it meets the fringe it is pulled through.

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Take the left side of the last fringe and weave it under Fringe 1.

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Now tie a square knot (a regular knot). Make sure you pull it tight.

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At this point, I prefer to wash the throw. It removes extra fuzz and sizing and any dirt from being on the floor!

  • Care Instructions: Machine wash normal cold, non-chlorine bleach, tumble dry low, do not iron

After washing, I like to tuck the edges of the knot under the fringes next to it. Sometimes they stay, and sometimes they don’t.

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Below is what your braided edge should look like. It makes for a soft understated edge.

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St. Patrick’s Day Single Layer Braided Edge Fleece Throw Recap

Supplies:

anti-pill or blizzard fleece

  • 1 yard for a baby, 1.5 yards for a child and 2 yards for an adult (these are standard sizes but you can make any size you wish / 2-3 yards if you’re sharing it on the sofa with another human or a pet!)
  • I prefer anti-pill fleece for throws and blankets because they are softer and do not pill as quickly with washing as the blizzard does.

Tools:
scissors or 45mm or 60mm rotary cutter
cutting mat (only if using a rotary cutter)
quilter’s ruler, 12″ ruler, yardstick, tape measure, or cardboard pattern
Xacto® knife, if desired (I use the #11 blade)

Instructions:

  1. Lay out the fabric on a flat surface, right side up (fold in half for ease).
  2. Cut the edges even and remove the selvage. Do not cut the folded edge!
  3. Cut out a 2″ square from each corner opposite the folded edge.
  4. Cut fringe 2″ deep and 1″ wide on the three cut sides (do not cut the folded side)!
  5. Cut the last fringe that ends at the fold through the fold to produce two fringes. Unfold your fabric.
  6. Cut a small slit about 1/3 to 1/2 of the way from the edge of the fringe in. Cut all fringes.
  7. Choose the middle of the side where you want to begin braiding.
  8. Begin weaving one fringe through the slit in the previous fringe until you go all the way around the throw and end at the last fringe.
  9. Cut the last fringe through its slit lengthwise.
  10. Weave one end under the “first fringe” and then tie a knot to secure.

Care Instructions: Machine wash normal cold, non-chlorine bleach, tumble dry low, do not iron

 

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